easysite
You are here > News > News Archive > Archive - 2017 > November 2017
.

November 2017

November 30

CCGs in mid and south Essex launch public consultation

The five clinical commissioning groups in mid and south Essex have today <Thursday> launched a formal public consultation on outline plans for the future of health and care services.

The proposals are a result of detailed work undertaken by clinical teams across health and care organisations to improve the services provided to the 1.2 million people living in mid and south Essex. 

The Joint Committee of the CCGs yesterday gave approval to begin consultation on proposals which include:

 Making improvements in A&E at all three hospitals with the development of new assessment and treatment centres alongside each A&E. All three A&Es will be led by a consultant, open 24 hours a day and will receive “blue light” ambulances.

 Develop a new specialist stroke centre which would provide the highest dependency and intensive care for people in the first 72 hours following a stroke alongside rapid access to diagnostics and specialist interventions. This would be in addition to the existing stroke care units at all three hospitals which would remain in place.

 Bring together in one place some specialist inpatient care where there is existing expertise and to allow for extended hours, seven day a week consultant and specialist cover for these services. Clinical evidence from elsewhere shows that this would improve care and the chances of a making a good recovery. 

 Separate some planned operations from emergency cases. Some complex orthopaedic operations that need a few days hospital stay could be performed in Southend Hospital for people in south Essex and Braintree Community Hospital for people in mid Essex. This would reduce cancelled operations and rates of infection by separating this type of care from emergency care.

 Moving community services closer to where people live. For example in Thurrock the proposals outline how services currently provided at Orsett Hospital could be provided in four new “integrated medical centres” and existing and new facilities across Basildon and Brentwood.

These changes are alongside the collective intention of health and care services to build up GP and community services and extend the range of professionals and services available via GP practices as part of a bold plan to provide increased care for local communities closer to where they live.

Dr Caroline Dollery, GP and chair of Mid Essex CCG said:

“The public consultation is an important next stage in the work we have been doing together to develop and build a health and care system fit for the future for the people of mid and south Essex and provide them with a further opportunity to give us their views to help shape the proposals.

“This is not a final decision to implement any of the changes described, which would only happen after the consultation with our local communities has finished and the feedback independently analysed.”

Dr Celia Skinner, chief medical officer for the three hospitals said:

“These proposals set out our ambition to reorganise services across our hospital sites in Basildon, Chelmsford, Southend and Orsett so that we are working together to deliver the best services we can, using our people and resources as effectively as possible for the greatest benefit.

“This happens already for a number of conditions and local doctors and health professionals have been working over many months on the possibilities of bringing together other highly specialist services and how best to separate emergency surgery from planned operations, to reduce cancellations. 

“We welcome the public consultation as it represents the next opportunity to discuss these proposals more formally with local people and stakeholders to further seek their views on the potential changes.”

Full details of the proposals and the ways in which people can get involved and have their say are available at www.nhsmidandsouthessex.co.uk

Feedback from the consultation will then undergo independent review before it is considered by the Joint Committee in the early summer of 2018 along with clinical evidence, financial plans and other details in a final business case.

ENDS

Editors’ notes:

1. For further information contact claire.hankey@southend.nhs.uk or pauillett@nhs.net

2. The Mid and South Essex STP brings together all health and care organisations to work on a single plan to respond to the rising number of people who need health and care services.

The Mid and South Essex STP is made up of the following health and care organisations:

NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), which plan and buy your healthcare with an annual allocation of funds from the Government

 Basildon and Brentwood CCG

 Castle Point and Rochford CCG

 Mid Essex CCG

 Southend CCG

 Thurrock CCG

The CCGs work closely with GP practices, pharmacies, social care and voluntary services in your area.

Local authorities, which provide social care and commission services from care agencies, care homes and voluntary services

  Essex County Council

  Southend-on sea Borough Council

  Thurrock Council

Organisations, which provide services commissioned by CCGs

 Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which provides services from Basildon and Orsett Hospitals

 Mid Essex Hospital Services NHS Trust, which provides services from Broomfield Hospital in Chelmsford and Braintree Community Hospital

 Southend University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, which provides services from Southend Hospital

 East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust

Organisations, which provide services commissioned by CCGs and local authorities

 Essex Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust, which provides community services, adult mental health services and inpatient children’s mental health services

 North East London NHS Foundation Trust (NELFT), which provides community services and children’s community mental health services

 Provide, which provides community and social care services

Planners and regulators

 Your local independent watchdog bodies - Healthwatch Essex, Healthwatch Southend and Healthwatch Thurrock

 NHS England specialised commissioning, which buys the most specialised services for the whole of the midlands and east region

 Health Education England, which is responsible for the development of the NHS workforce

 NHS England and NHS Improvement, the national regulators of the NHS

November 24

Conference embraces partnership working and inspires nurses and midwives to lead and innovate

Nurses and midwives from across Essex and aspiring health and social care students from Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) were brought together at the first ever Nursing and Midwifery Conference.

Jointly organised by the Mid and South Essex Sustainability and Transformation Partnership (STP) and Anglia Ruskin University, the event was hosted in the lecture theatre of the Michael Salmon building at ARU.

The aim of the event was to inspire nurses and midwives to be leaders and to share the vision for the three hospitals (Mid Essex, Southend and Basildon) that make up the Mid and South Essex STP.

Guest speakers included Jane Cummings, Chief Nursing Officer NHS England; Ruth May, Executive Director of Nursing, NHS Improvement; Clare Panniker, CEO, Mid and South Essex Hospitals; and Professor Ruth Taylor, Pro Vice Chancellor and Dean of the Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education at ARU.

Diane Sarkar, Chief Nurse for the Mid and South Essex STP wants nurses and midwives to “step up” and work collaboratively to meet the ever-changing demands, expectations and challenges over the forthcoming year.

Diane said: “I want nurses and midwives to be able to inspire and innovate change during this exciting time as we contribute to the transformation of patient pathways. When they leave this event, I want them to go back into practice enthused and motivated by the guest speakers. I’d also like to thank our nurses and midwives for their hard work and all that they do in our hospitals. We want strong nursing and midwifery leaders. The conference was full of experience. Let’s work together moving forward to provide the best care for our patients.”

Professor Jane Cummings also spoke about the importance of nurses being willing to lead and share ideas. Speaking about the NHS’s Leading Change, Adding Value campaign, she added: “Nurses and midwives are in a place where they can lead that change. Sometimes it is really important to find the time to step back and ask ‘how can we help use our ideas to make a difference?’ You see things that others don’t.”

Attendees also heard from Ruth May, Executive Director of Nursing, NHS Improvement and Clare Panniker, Chief Executive of Mid and South Essex Hospitals, as well as a range of speakers covering topics from innovation in healthcare to resilience and leadership.

Clare Panniker said: “I’m certain there are days when you don’t feel the work you have done has been recognised or appreciated, but I do genuinely understand that nursing today is highly complex and requires a high level of skills. What you do on a daily basis, even if you don’t feel it, makes a huge difference to the patients and their families. The professionalism with which you carry out your role, makes an impact on the people you come into contact with.”

Recent graduates from Anglia Ruskin shared their experience of practice and spoke about their own innovative projects covering students as leaders; behaviours and values in children’s nursing; and enhanced sepsis screening.

Professor Ruth Taylor, Dean of the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education at Anglia Ruskin University, said: “Nursing and midwifery have been part of Anglia Ruskin’s DNA for decades, and it was fantastic to see nurses from different trusts across Essex coming together and sharing some inspirational and innovative ideas to improve care for patients across the county. This conference signals a development of our partnerships with these trusts, which are going from strength to strength.”

Alongside staff from the hospitals, Molly Case, spoken word artist, writer and registered nurse gave her unique insight into the profession, while sepsis survivor Tom Ray and his wife Nicola, gave an emotional account of their experience of the NHS, life-threatening illness and simply surviving.

November 23

CCGs in mid and south Essex to decide on consultation

The Joint Committee of the five clinical commissioning groups are set to consider proposals for public consultation at the end of this month on the future of health and care services across mid and south Essex.

These proposals are a result of detailed work undertaken by clinical teams across health and care organisations to improve the services provided to the 1.2 million people living in mid and south Essex.

A detailed pre-consultation business case and a plan for a period of public consultation will be considered and have been published in draft (http://bit.ly/2mUdsKq) today (23rd November), ahead of the meeting to be held on the 29th November 2017 in the Marconi Suite, Civic Centre, Duke Street, Chelmsford at 3pm.

The Joint Committee will be asked to give approval to commence consultation on these proposals, which include:

 Improvements in A&E at all three hospitals with the development of four new assessment and treatment centres alongside each A&E. All three A&Es will be led by a consultant, open 24 hours a day and will receive “blue light” ambulances. They will be able to treat the majority of cases. It is estimated that the number of patients that would need to transfer from a local A&E to a specialist team in another hospital could be around 14 patients a day.

 A new “hyper acute stroke unit” close to the existing cardiothoracic centre in Basildon, which specialises in treatments for serious heart and lung problems. The new unit would provide the highest dependency and intensive care for people that have had a stroke in the first 72 hours following a stroke. This would be in addition to the existing stroke care units at all three hospitals which would remain in place.

 Some specialist inpatient care being brought together in one place, where there is existing expertise and to allow for extended hours, seven day a week consultant and specialist cover for these services. This is based clinical evidence that this would improve care and chances of a making a good recovery. Examples include gynaecological surgery at Southend Hospital, urological surgery at Broomfield Hospital in Chelmsford and surgery for arteries and veins at Basildon Hospital.

 Some planned operations being done separately from emergency cases. Some complex operations that need a few days hospital stay could be performed in Southend Hospital for people in south Essex and Braintree Community Hospital for people in mid Essex.

 Move community services closer to where people live. For example in Thurrock the proposals outline how services currently provided at Orsett Hospital could be provided in four new “integrated medical centres” and existing community centres in Basildon and Brentwood. Once this has happened it will be possible to close Orsett Hospital which is difficult to access by public transport and needs significant investment to bring up to modern standard.

These changes are alongside the collective intention of health and care services to build up GP and community services and extend the range of professionals and services available via GP practices as part of a bold plan to provide increased care for local communities closer to where they live.

Professor Mike Bewick, independent chair of the CCG Joint Committee, said:

“The Joint Committee will discuss proposals to move to public consultation. If agreed, this will be an important next stage in the work we have been doing together to develop and build a health and care system fit for the future for the people of mid and south Essex and provide them with a further opportunity to give us their views to help shape the proposals.”

If approval is given to proceed, full details of the consultation will be available from www.nhsmidandsouthessex.co.uk.

Feedback from the consultation could then be considered by the Joint Committee in the early summer of 2018 along with clinical evidence, financial plans and other details in a final business case.

ENDS

Editors’ notes:

1. For further information contact Claire.hankey@southend.nhs.uk

2. Proposals for consultation are subject to approval of the Joint Committee of clinical commissioning groups. This will be a decision to consult on these proposals, not any final decision to implement these proposals which would only happen after consultation with local communities.

3. The Mid and South Essex STP brings together all health and care organisations to work on a single plan to respond to the rising number of people who need health and care services.

The Mid and South Essex STP is made up of the following health and care organisations:

NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), which plan and buy your healthcare with an annual allocation of funds from the Government

 Basildon and Brentwood CCG

 Castle Point and Rochford CCG

 Mid Essex CCG

 Southend CCG

 Thurrock CCG

The CCGs work closely with GP practices, pharmacies, social care and voluntary services in your area.

Local authorities, which provide social care and commission services from care agencies, care homes and voluntary services

 Essex County Council

 Southend-on sea Borough Council

 Thurrock Council

Organisations, which provide services commissioned by CCGs

 Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which provides services from Basildon and Orsett Hospitals

 Mid Essex Hospital Services NHS Trust, which provides services from Broomfield Hospital in Chelmsford and Braintree Community Hospital

 Southend University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, which provides services from Southend Hospital

 East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust

Organisations, which provide services commissioned by CCGs and local authorities

 Essex Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust, which provides community services, adult mental health services and inpatient children’s mental health services

 North East London NHS Foundation Trust (NELFT), which provides community services and children’s community mental health services

 Provide, which provides community and social care services

Planners and regulators

 Your local independent watchdog bodies - Healthwatch Essex, Healthwatch Southend and Healthwatch Thurrock

 NHS England specialised commissioning, which buys the most specialised services for the whole of the midlands and east region

 Health Education England, which is responsible for the development of the NHS workforce

 NHS England and NHS Improvement, the national regulators of the NHS

Debbie Brewer
Debbie Brewer.

November 23

Patient Story: Robotic Surgery Has Changed My Life Completely

Debbie Brewer, 43, from Chelmsford

“My first symptoms started on April 2 this year. I was eating lunch but could keep nothing down. It was really strange because I didn't feel ill or nauseous at all. After a few days of sometimes being able to eat kind of normally and other times not at all, I saw a doctor at my GP surgery. She wanted to test for a stomach infection, but due to some medication I was on this couldn't be done for another two weeks. In the meantime, the symptoms continued. I still didn't feel ill, but I was really struggling to keep any food down, just things like scrambled eggs and yoghurt. Obviously I was losing weight pretty quickly and had very little energy. 

“I went back and saw a different GP. On describing my symptoms she immediately suggested it could be achalasia – quite a rare condition – and referred me to a gastroenterologist. I was booked in for an endoscopy at the beginning of May but by this time I was also having difficulty keeping fluids down and was very dehydrated. As a result of this, about a week before the endoscopy I had to go to A&E – they put me on fluids overnight which helped me feel better. 

“The endoscopy showed that the sphincter between my oesophagus and stomach was very tight but the gastroenterologist couldn't be sure that it was achalasia. It was at this stage he referred me to Mr Kadirkamanathan. As soon as I met Mr Kadirkamanathan, I felt confident that he could diagnose my condition and hopefully fix it. He sent me for a CT scan to rule out anything else pressing on my oesophagus and when that came back clear, he sent me to the Royal London Hospital for a test called an oesophageal manometry test. This test is apparently the gold standard in diagnosing achalasia and which type. 

“The test confirmed I had type two achalasia and Mr Kadirkamanathan talked me through my options which included balloon dilation, botox injections or surgery. Given how severe my symptoms had become so quickly I decided to go ahead with surgery as it offered the best long-term solution. Mr Kadirkamanathan explained that the operation involved cutting the muscles of the sphincter so that it was permanently relaxed, thereby allowing food to pass into my stomach. He told me that the main risk was accidently perforating the oesophagus, which could lead to severe complications. Mr Kadirkamanathan said that the best way to reduce this risk was to do the surgery robotically so that there was much greater precision. 

“My operation was scheduled for June 21. By this time I had lost three stone in weight and had very little energy - I hadn't eaten in weeks and was struggling to keep even water down. Obviously l don't remember anything of the operation which was about four hours long but as soon as I woke up in recovery I knew I felt better – I was able to sip water without any problem at all and by the time I was back on the ward I was drinking water perfectly normally. 

“Mr Kadirkamanathan had told me that I would notice the difference immediately, but I was really surprised at how well I felt straight after the operation. The following lunchtime I was able to have soup, which tasted amazing. I was discharged later that day and had the following week off work to recover and build my strength up again. I stuck to soft foods such as soups, fish, and mashed potato for the first week or two, but my appetite was back to normal very quickly and now five months later there isn't anything that I avoid eating.

“As Mr Kadirkamanathan says, I will always have achalasia, but the surgery he was able to perform using the robotic technique has changed my life completely – I’m able to go out with friends and family now feeling totally confident that I can share a meal with them without being worried that I might get sick. As soon as I met with Mr Kadirkamanathan, I had total confidence in his ability to make me better again. His interest in my particular condition and his passion to learn more about it and develop new techniques for treating it were very evident. The use of robotic equipment to perform the surgery meant that I had just an overnight stay in hospital and a very short recovery time afterwards. I was truly amazed given how ill I had been feeling for months that I felt 100% better as soon as I woke up from the operation and there have been no on-going issues at all.”

‘Our Charity’ is calling on the community to rally together for our £1.5million appeal to fund the upgrading of the robotic surgery service at Broomfield Hospital, including a state-of-the-art new surgical robot and the continued use of surgical robotics.

There is significant evidence that demonstrates a number of advantages for patients who have benefited from surgery with the surgical robot compared to conventional surgical techniques including:

 •0% perforation rate (compared to 12% rate across the world)

•Shorter hospital stays

•Immediate effects within recovery

•Precision surgery (overcoming limitations of laparoscopic surgery)

•Articulation beyond normal manipulation

•Naturally occurring tremors filtered out by computer software

Your support will put Broomfield Hospital firmly on the map as surgical innovators in Essex.

You can donate to our appeal, ‘Rally Together for the Robot’, here: https://www.justgiving.com/campaigns/charity/midessexhospitals/surgicalbot.


Opening of the Second Dementia Garden
Attendees celebrate the opening of the second dementia garden.

November 23

Staff, dignitaries and volunteers gather to celebrate the opening of the second dementia-friendly garden

Staff, dignitaries and volunteers gathered to celebrate the opening of our second dementia-friendly garden on Saturday, November 18.

More than 50 people, including the Mayor of Chelmsford Duncan Lumley, Essex County Councillor John Spence, Cabinet Member for Health and Adult Social Care, and a representative from the Friends at Broomfield Hospital, attended to mark the occasion at the ‘Live-Well Garden’, outside Baddow Ward. 

The new sensory garden, which builds on the huge success of the ‘Forget-Me-Not Garden’ at neighbouring Braxted Ward, provides a therapeutic outside environment for patients and visitors to enjoy. 

The garden was funded via charitable donations of £50,000. 

More than 40 volunteers, including many staff members, assisted with the construction of the garden over in excess of 220 hours throughout the summer.

In total, 50 tonnes of soil and shingle, plus thousands of plants have been moved. The garden was cleared and fully developed within the space of six months. 

Yvonne Carter, charities manager, said: “This demonstrates the value that ‘Our Charity’ adds to patient and carer experience around our trust and that we really couldn’t fund projects such as this one without the generosity of all those that support ‘Our Charity’.”

Elmarie Swanepoel, estates and facilities site manager, said: “We are keen to provide a high-quality environment for people with dementia whilst they are in hospital. The health benefits of spending time in therapeutic outside environments are well-documented and we are thrilled to be able to open this beautiful garden. 

“This garden, along with various other green spaces at the hospital, has only been made possible through charitable donations and will be maintained by our wonderful hospital garden volunteers. We are grateful for the generous support of everyone who has been involved with this project.”

The garden can be viewed from inside, within the central corridor of levels 2, 3 and 4 Zone C, West Wing. If you are walking down these routes, you can view this area alongside the first garden on the opposite side. 
 
For further information, please contact: 

Yvonne Carter, charities manager
Yvonne.Carter@meht.nhs.uk
01245 514559

Elmarie Swanepoel, estates and facilities site manager
Elmarie.Swanepoel@meht.nhs.uk 
01245 515230

November 14

Emergency Department win accolade as part of Royal College of Emergency Medicine 50th anniversary celebrations

Many congratulations to the Emergency Department for winning an accolade as part of the 50th anniversary of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine celebrations. 

The team have been commended by the School of Emergency Medicine, Health Education, East of England, for the outstanding training they have provided to ED doctors. Dr Pawan Gupta, consultant in emergency medicine, has also received a certificate for contribution, performance and commitment towards the development of training in emergency medicine in the East of England.

Dr Gupta received the awards on behalf of the trust while attending the Emergency Medicine Regional Faculty Day at The Møller Centre, Cambridge, on October 20.

Dr Gupta said: “Well done to everybody for their constant endeavours to support the junior doctors in their training and career development. I am very proud of our ED colleagues.”

Lisa Hunt, managing director, and Ellie Makings, medical director, said: “Congratulations to Dr Gupta and the Emergency Department on these fantastic achievements, which are testament to our culture of supporting and nurturing talent here at Mid Essex.”


Nursing Times Awards

November 3

Research and Development Team win prestigious Nursing Times award

Many congratulations to the Research and Development Team on winning a prestigious accolade at the Nursing Times awards.

The team were presented with the ‘Clinical Research Nursing’ award, sponsored by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR), at a ceremony at the Grosvenor House Hotel, London, last night (Thursday, November 2).

Having been announced as finalists for two categories – ‘Clinical Research Nursing’ and ‘Team of the Year’ - in July, they then had to closely follow a strict brief and prepare two detailed presentations for the judging panels. Five members of the research team were selected to face the judges, undergo intensive interviews and deliver the presentations. 

The department were shortlisted for their innovation of merging the oncology research, generic research and R&D teams, who had always previously worked in complete isolation from each other. By combining their skills and continually adapting, the research team now has a strong identity, shared goals and is actively changing the research culture within the trust. 

The judges were particularly impressed by the number of patients who are now offered research opportunities at MEHT and the excellent standard of nursing care delivered. Since becoming an integrated department, the number of patients entering national studies at Broomfield Hospital has increased by over 200% and we are now the highest recruiting district general hospital in the East of England.

Lauren Perkins, research and development innovation manager, said: “It is my absolute pleasure to announce that we won the ‘Clinical Research Nursing’ award.

“I’m beaming with pride this morning and I’m so proud of the hard work that the team do day in, day out."

Lyn Hinton, director of nursing, said: “Well done to our Research and Development Team for this outstanding achievement. It is wonderful to see them recognised on a national platform and is cause for celebration across the trust.”


November 1

Friends at Broomfield Hospital kindly donate £10,000 to help purchase equipment to measure limb volume

The Friends at Broomfield Hospital have kindly donated £10,000 to help fund a piece of equipment which is used to assess lymphoedema. 

On Wednesday, October 18, the perometer was installed at the St Andrews Centre gym and will benefit patients suffering from the chronic condition. The remainder of the almost £23,000 cost was met by the department. 

It assists clinicians to measure the swelling of the limb, caused by a collection of fluid in the body’s tissues. The condition develops when the lymphatic system, which helps to fight infection and remove excess fluid, does not work properly. It is often the result of cancer or cancer treatment. 

The perometer functions using photosensors and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with which the limb is illuminated and scanned. The actual measuring unit is installed in the frame, which is pushed over the limb.  

Following staff training, the perometer will now be brought into use. 

Mr Mat Griffiths, consultant plastic surgeon, said: “We are very grateful to the Friends at Broomfield Hospital, who have greatly assisted our fundraising efforts which will benefit patients by allowing our therapist, Annette Palmer, to measure limb volumes far more accurately and efficiently than by using a standard tape measure technique.”